lifetime of art

Art gathers

231,000 notes

princeofpans:

rashaka:

strictlybecca:

faramirs:

#its ridiculous how much i love this pairing IT SET THE BAR FOR ALL OTHER PAIRINGS EVER I THINK

i’m still haunted by the line “princesses don’t marry kitchen boys” because the absolute _resignation_ and heartbreak in that line still hurts my heart.

This movie is the best and if you think otherwise you can fight me.

(via dreamwurks)

Filed under anastasia dimitri love

232,234 notes

fakeituntilyoumakeitphff:

spoken-not-written:

oopsphan:

darlinghogwarts:

In the books, Hermione’s boggart is failing her classes. Her greatest fear is failing her classes.
However, it goes a lot deeper than that. Subconsciously, I think she believes that if she does not do well and if she fails, they’ll kick her out of Hogwarts and the Wizarding World. So her real fear isn’t failing.
At Hogwarts, she has two wonderful friends who love her, and she is getting to live in an incredible world. She doesn’t want to lose that, and she thinks that if she does bad in her classes, they won’t let her come back.
Her real fear is rejection and loss.

so what if…
when in the philosophers stone her line “we could be killed, or worse.. expelled” wasn’t her being snooty or a teachers pet..
but her saying that she would rather die than stop going to hogwarts and never see her friends again?

why

fakeituntilyoumakeitphff:

spoken-not-written:

oopsphan:

darlinghogwarts:

In the books, Hermione’s boggart is failing her classes. Her greatest fear is failing her classes.

However, it goes a lot deeper than that. Subconsciously, I think she believes that if she does not do well and if she fails, they’ll kick her out of Hogwarts and the Wizarding World. So her real fear isn’t failing.

At Hogwarts, she has two wonderful friends who love her, and she is getting to live in an incredible world. She doesn’t want to lose that, and she thinks that if she does bad in her classes, they won’t let her come back.

Her real fear is rejection and loss.

so what if…

when in the philosophers stone her line “we could be killed, or worse.. expelled” wasn’t her being snooty or a teachers pet..

but her saying that she would rather die than stop going to hogwarts and never see her friends again?

why

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(via dreamwurks)

Filed under harrypotter harry potter hermione hermione granger i so much love her

6,420 notes

Sometimes you’re 23 and standing in the kitchen of your house making breakfast and brewing coffee and listening to music that for some reason is really getting to your heart. You’re just standing there thinking about going to work and picking up your dry cleaning. And also more exciting things like books you’re reading and trips you plan on taking and relationships that are springing into existence. Or fading from your memory, which is far less exciting. And suddenly you just don’t feel at home in your skin or in your house and you just want home but “Mom’s” probably wouldn’t feel like home anymore either. There used to be the comfort of a number in your phone and ears that listened every day and arms that were never for anyone else. But just to calm you down when you started feeling trapped in a five-minute period where nostalgia is too much and thoughts of this person you are feel foreign. When you realize that you’ll never be this young again but this is the first time you’ve ever been this old. When you can’t remember how you got from sixteen to here and all the same feel like sixteen is just as much of a stranger to you now. The song is over. The coffee’s done. You’re going to breath in and out. You’re going to be fine in about five minutes.
Kalyn RoseAnne, (x)

(Source: quotethat, via dreamwurks)

200,526 notes

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

(via hiccup-theuseless)

Filed under rights women rights human rights so glad for this